Dr. Steven Gradwohl

This weekend, we lost a beloved member of our Health System family when Dr. Steven Gradwohl, a member of our Medical School faculty since 1994, was killed in an automobile crash on Interstate 94. I know too well the shock of such a tragic loss and my deepest condolences go out to his family, friends and colleagues. He will be greatly missed and always remembered. Dr. Gradwohl’s obituary can be found here.

In Celebration of Nurses

“You must never so much think as whether you like it or not, whether it is bearable or not; you must never think of anything except the need, and how to meet it.”  ― Clara Barton, Nurse & Founder of the American Red Cross

Each year for a week, in honor of Florence Nightingale’s birthday on May 12, we celebrate those individuals who have dedicated their lives to a profession that is among the most noble, demanding and rewarding: Nursing.

Nurses are important ambassadors of the patient and family experience because they are on the frontlines delivering care and comfort 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.  They are in classrooms, labs and clinics training future generations of nursing professionals and discovering ways to improve care and care delivery. They are in the community working and volunteering at shelters and in schools.  And, across the country, nursing professionals are strong voices for innovation and change when it comes to shaping health care policy and influencing health care reform.

Under the steadfast leadership of Kate Potempa, Dean of the U-M School of Nursing, and Margaret Calarco, Chief Nurse at UMHHC, nursing at Michigan is thriving and our institution continues to be regarded as one of the country’s best academic nursing centers.  The School’s Master’s Program is the sixth best in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report, its research-focused Ph.D. programs rank in the National Research Council’s top 5 percent and it ranks sixth in NIH research funding. Additionally, it is a hub of groundbreaking innovation, as demonstrated by being the first U.S. nursing school to partner with the Peace Corps’ Masters International Program, achievement of a 5-year grant to fund the prestigious Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation, and, in partnership with the UMHS nursing community, establishing the Clinical Initiative for Excellence in Education, Practice and Scholarship to improve the quality and safety of nursing care practice and delivery. UMHS nurses have influenced the profession by publishing more than 50 manuscripts and book chapters this past year alone and presenting more than 70 paper and poster presentations to national and international audiences. Additionally, the Health System’s new Nursing governance model is enabling deeper partnerships with patients and families and establishing new models of nursing care.  As clinical mentors to the hundreds of nursing students we serve, our nurses join with nursing students and faculty to educate our next generation of nurses and create the future of health care delivery.

From care at the bedside to outpatient appointments to nursing education and research to professional and peer support and mentorship, there is no more committed community of nurses than the 4,000 plus nursing professionals at Michigan.

While it shouldn’t take a national event to remind us to thank the incredible nursing professionals who enable excellence across our Health System and University, there certainly is no better time for all of us to offer gratitude to the nursing heroes, teachers, mentors and leaders in our community. Thank you for all that you do!!

Creating the Future Through Philanthropy: Every Interaction Counts

Last month, I received an email from the UMHS Office of Development that said: I am delighted to inform you of a gift agreement we recently received [from Dr. Eva Schaff-Blass and her husband Josef] to establish the Ora H. Pescovitz Honorary Scholarship Fund in your honor. This scholarship will be awarded to an M4 student this year.

To say I was surprised is an understatement! I was incredibly moved, honored and humbled by this act of generosity.

I first met fellow endocrinologist Dr. Eva Schaff-Blass in 2000, when I delivered Pediatric Grand Rounds and the Endocrine Visiting Lecture at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. She was an associate professor of Pediatrics there at the time. Our paths crossed again in 2005 when Eva became a professor of Clinical Pediatrics and associate director of General Pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. This was soon after I had become president and CEO of Riley Hospital for Children, where Eva performed her clinical duties. At that time, I also was a professor of Pediatrics and served as executive associate dean for Research Affairs at IU, so it was only natural that we would have some professional interactions. During one such encounter, Eva referenced the positive impact that my lecture in 2000 had on her and her colleagues, and she told me that she learned a lot from my leadership style. I was flattered and proud. Two years later, Eva went back to North Carolina to serve as medical director of Blue Cross/Blue Shield of NC, and two years after that I took my position here at Michigan.

What I didn’t fully register until I received that email last month was that Eva has maize and blue in her blood!  She attended U-M medical school and completed her residency here in the Department of Pediatrics. Later, she returned to U-M to earn a Masters of Public Health. Additionally, her son is a U-M graduate, her husband received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University, and her father, Adam Schaff, a philosophy professor at the Warsaw University, received an honorary degree from the University of Michigan in 1967. To make this scholarship gift at a time when I am maize and blue myself is truly fantastic, and it pays homage to our proud U-M tradition.

Philanthropic giving is vital to our institution and to the future of medicine, especially at a time of shrinking federal funding. But, philanthropy is much more than just a money channel.

Philanthropy is a way to create personal and meaningful transformations for donors and for the faculty, students, staff and institutions that benefit from their generosity. It is a way that individuals and families who have been touched by UMHS can give back and create a powerful and long-lasting connection to the work that we do. It connects the present to the future.

I have heard generosity called a “gate” — a doorway through which we enter into deeper relationships with those to whom we have given or from whom we have received. I would add that it’s also a portal that connects us to a larger community seeking to make the world a better place.

Beginning today and regularly on Medicine That Speaks, I will highlight stories that demonstrate the critical role philanthropy plays in our mission. To start, I want to share a video that is a beautiful example of the impact our donors – many of whom are patients – make on our work. It features Dr. Lawrence Marentette, director of U-M’s Cranial Base program, talking about the selfless gift given by Matthew Vogel, a young patient with an untreatable rare tumor.

After watching the video, Matthew’s parents had this to say: “We think this is a beautiful tribute to Matthew and it certainly expresses Matthew’s one wish – to do whatever he could to defeat this awful disease, if not for himself, for others.… We can only hope that it will inspire others to support the ongoing research that has already made a difference in people’s lives.”

Like Matthew and his family, the hundreds of generous donors who support our work are true partners.  We are creating the future of health care together – through discovery, and through philanthropy. If you have a story to share, please email Amy Bunch, senior director of Development Strategic Communications, at amybunch@umich.edu.

 

Our Global Impact: The Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative

When Rockefeller (Rocky) Oteng was a child living in Ghana, he noticed that people who went to Europe or the United States for their education often didn’t come back home. Instead, they stayed in those other countries to work, live and thrive. This made him wonder – Why did Ghanians have to go someplace else to become somebody?

When he was 9, Rocky and his family left Ghana and moved to Northern Virginia. He went on to earn a medical degree from the University of Cincinnati College Of Medicine and then joined the University of Michigan as a resident in the Department of Emergency Medicine. Rocky always believed that there would come a time when he could help make a difference in the world. One of the reasons he chose to study emergency medicine was because it would give him knowledge and skills to help the greatest number of people. Throughout his training, the question of why Ghanians needed to leave home to be “somebody” remained on his mind, and in 2009 he decided to dedicate his work to bringing emergency medicine to Ghana.

According to Rocky, prior to 2009 the state of emergency medicine in Ghana was dismal. There were terrifying stories within the Ghanaian community of family members presenting to the hospital and dying from easily preventable causes. There were studies that showed that the acutely ill and injured people were dying at a higher rate in Ghana than in other developed nations. Rocky dreamed of doing something to change this, starting with creating an in-country emergency medicine training program.

Of course, every dream requires support and for Rocky this help came in two forms: a pilot grant from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative http://www.mepinetwork.org/, which funds medical education and research in Sub-Saharan African institutions, and matching funds provided Dr. William Barsan, who was chair of Emergency Medicine at the time.

Thus, the Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative was born.

Rocky is a man of great compassion, vision and ambition. But, to build a successful Collaborative, you need partners. Fortunately, Rocky also is a Michigan (Health System) man and therefore has access to incredible mentors like Drs. Barsan, Robert Neumar, Joe Kolars and Terry Kowalenko, as well as like-minded and like-hearted colleagues, such as Sue Ann Bell, MSN, FNP-BC. Working with partners from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, the Ghana Ministry of Health and the Ghana College of Physicians and Surgeons, Oteng, Bell and the rest of the team have made great progress with the Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative through exchange and in-country training programs. To date, they have graduated seven Ghanaian physicians from the residency program, with 15 more physicians and 27 nurses currently in training. Additionally, they have been engaged in efforts to continue to build an academic department and local emergency response systems. It is impressive work that will serve the people of Ghana for decades to come. Take a look:

When we talk about our Health System’s global impact, we mean more than just going into other countries to help, though that is certainly an important part. We also mean creating programs like the Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative and partnering with in-country agencies, universities and governments to build sustainable and culturally-appropriate local health infrastructures and medical training programs. In doing so, we help bolster the health and productivity of citizens, communities and economies.

Today, as we celebrate Earth Day, let’s reflect on our role as global citizens.

What is/will be your global impact?

 

 

I’m Not a Rockette, But I Played One “For The Kids”

The caliber of students at the University of Michigan never ceases to amaze me! Their academic excellence and ambition are impressive, as is their extraordinary passion to serve others. This month, I experienced two powerful reminders of the important role that our terrific students play in the Health System.

On March 15, I got to stop in and say hello during the Match Day luncheon. I was incredibly inspired as I talked to members of the Medical School’s remarkable 2013 graduating class and their beaming friends and families. It was an exciting day for all as the students learned where they would be doing their residency training. This year, 72% of students matched to residency programs in the nation’s top hospitals, including U-M, Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University in St. Louis, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle, UCSF Medical Center in California and other leading academic medical centers across the country.

Later that day, I participated in a video shoot with members of the Dance Marathon at University of Michigan team. DMUM is one of the largest student-run non-profit organizations on the U-M campus. We taped a PSA to promote this year’s Marathon – an event where hundreds of students stand on their feet for 30 hours to show their support for pediatric services at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Beaumont Hospital. Since 1998, DMUM has raised funds to support pediatric rehabilitation programs at Mott Hospital, as well as our Child and Family Life program and Trails Edge Camp for ventilator-dependent children.

In an email I received after the video shoot, Monica Walls, DMUM Internal Director 2012-2013, said: “. . . As a senior at the University of Michigan, I can truly say that DMUM has defined my college career and shaped me into the person that I am today. It has taught me the value of hard work, dedication and passion for a cause that I truly believe in. It means so much to have the support of Health System leadership in our mission. I feel so blessed, honored and humbled to be a part of this wonderful community, and know that I will forever feel tied to the Maize and Blue. . . .For The Kids, Monica”

I encourage all faculty and staff to support our students through mentoring, by celebrating Match Day and other milestones, or by participating in fundraisers like the Galens Medical Society’s Tag Days or Smoker, and the University of Michigan Dance Marathon. These and so many other opportunities are how we demonstrate a true community of Leaders & Best.

Be one of the first to see the official DMUM PSA:

A Comment on Sequestration

While there is much still unknown about how sequestration will affect the nation and academic medical centers like the U-M Health System, we will continue to monitor the situation. I encourage you to read today’s University Record article What does sequestration mean for U-M? to gain further insight and understanding of the potential impact of sequestration on our University.